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Friday, December 14, 2018

UFO bells ring, are you listening?

Winter is just about here in the Northeastern United States.  December has been cold, with temperatures in the twenties and thirties.  We had a dusting of snow, yesterday, in Connecticut - not much in the way of accumulation, you can still see the dead leaves poking through, but enough white on the ground to say, "Wear a coat," to the kids.

We should get a lot more precipitation over the weekend but it will warm up enough for it to probably come down as rain.  Still, a Nor'easter could blow through anytime and dump a couple feet of snow on us.  Whenever that happens, I think about aliens.  Also, whenever it does not snow I think about aliens.

Farmer's Almanac Winter 2018-19
Would a blinding blizzard be a good time for aliens to visit, or a bad time?  It would depend on their intentions and their capabilities.

I will start with capabilities.  We can assume that anyone with the ability to create an aircraft, capable of high-altitude flight, probably has access to radar and similar / related technology which aid flight.  This would help alien spaceships in navigating through a snowstorm.  If we have computer-aided auto-pilot, they must too.  It is highly unlikely that we have thought of any technology that they do not already have.  So we will include all of it.

What else do they have?  It is hard to imagine that which we have not yet invented but surely anyone who can get from there to here must have the ability to get through a blizzard, automatically adjusting for wind shears gusting up to hurricane strength, and dumping snow, with ease.  They were able to get from another solar system at the speed of light (or faster) without being torn apart by tiny bits of space flotsam, so they should be able to navigate a blizzard.  But would they want to?

What benefit would there be to taking on the added risk of flying through a terrible storm?  What would they do once they landed, if they landed?  They would not be able to see much.  Visibility in a Nor'easter can drop well under a quarter mile.  X-Rays and other technology we do not yet have would help.  Maybe they even have eyes which can see things we cannot, like other rays on the light spectrum.  Maybe they see in infrared.  We do not know.  But it is possible, whether through evolution, advanced technology, or even bio-engineering, seeing through a blinding snow storm is no problem for a race of people with a million+ year head start on us.

 The Extra Space Ship

Extra Space Ship
The Extra Space Ship
If they could navigate and if they could see, would they want to get out of their ships?  I would not.  I am a reasonable person.  It is likely that aliens are too - if not, they would have killed each other off by now, right?  I will sometimes get in my Extra Space Ship and go out in a blizzard if I already happen to be away from home and need to get home.  I will go out if my wife is driving home in a storm and needs help or if a friend loses power and needs shelter until power is restored.  I probably would not go out for bread and milk, not that there would be any on the shelves.  I will also get out of the car if I need to clean off my windshield or if someone needs help.  Otherwise, I will stay inside the car with the heat blasting against the windshield.

Having grown up in the Northeast, there are many times I went out in a snow storm to visit friends or just get out of the house.  We did not think it was a big deal, back in the 1980's.  It seems different today, though.  Schools shut down when the Weatherman even hints at a few inches of snow.  Have we evolved in our thinking and become more risk-averse over the past few decades?  If so, would aliens also have a much lower tolerance for risk?

I believe that, like humans, aliens would have the ability to get out of their ships and walk around, they just would not want to unless they absolutely had to.  So what might cause that?

 Alien Sneak Attack

If an alien civilization wanted to make first contact, it would make sense to do it on a nice sunny day, at least for our sake if not for their own.  So rolling up in a snow storm would not be a good sign.  It would likely indicate an attack.  During a Nor'easter, transportation can grind to a halt.  Highways are closed.  Planes are grounded.  We can become house-bound.  Aliens?  Not so much.  This would be an ideal time to attack.

We do this, ourselves.  Before deploying ground troops, the US military will take out bridges and other infrastructure, from the air, to reduce the mobility of our adversaries.  In the Six Day War, Israel got wind of a planned sneak attack against them so they directed their pilots to destroy Arab-State planes while they sat on the runways, nullifying the Arab advantage.  During World War II, the Japanese destroyed nearly the entire US Pacific Fleet while it was docked in Pearl Harbor, drastically setting back our ability to counter-attack.  It is what you do ahead of an attack.

If you had the ability to fly through a blinding snow storm with hurricane-force winds, with ease, you would not even need to disable your adversary's infrastructure or their mobility options.  Mother Nature would have already done it for you.  You would then be free to wreak havoc on the other side.  If you wanted to ensure the other side did not dig out a couple days later and counter-attack, you could seek out any target you wanted and advance upon it, unimpeded.

I wonder if our military leaders have considered this.  Are they prepared for an alien sneak attack during a crippling snow storm?


Alien Sneak Attack





If you have seen an alien spaceship or any type of unidentified flying object (UFO) contact me using the Contact form on this page or call me at 401-315-9102 between 6:00am and 7:00am Eastern USA (New York) time, any weekday.

You may remain anonymous if you want.  I will not ridicule you or try to tell you why you are wrong.  I get it, I saw one too.

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Thank you for reading and keep an eye on the sky.

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